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Jukola 2019: Stora Tuna takes surprise victory!

Stora_Tuna_OK_3000

[Updated with links to maps and full GPS-tracking] Stora Tuna (Sweden) took the victory in the 2019-edition of Jukula after a strong last leg by Emil Svensk. Stora Tuna was a surprise victory with their very young team. Actually more than half of the team are brothers: Emil, Joakim, Viktor and Jesper Svensk won Jukola together with Anton Sjøkvist, Olle Kalered and Henrik Johannesson!

Three teams battled for victory throughout the last leg – with the young Stora Tuna team deciding the race for themselves through secure and good orienteering. Tyrving (Norway) finished second – one of the world’s very best orienteers Matthias Kyrburz did not manage to keep up with Svensk.  Tampereen Pyrintö finished third with Florian Howald on the last leg.

Last year’s winned Koovee finished down in 7th place, and one of the big pre-favourites IFK Göteborg finished 5th.

Read on for the race development from leg to leg – and see the full final results at the bottom of the article.

Top photo: Fred Härtelt, German Orienteering Federation

Maps and full GPS tracking

Leg 1: Kristiansand OK in the lead

Kristiansand OK was one of the dominating team in 10Mila and Jukola some years ago, but the last year’s the Norwegian team has not been battling for top results in the big club relays. But a first leg victory is still a nice one for the books and for the first leg runner Dag Blandkjenn. Rehns BK with Jerker Lysell finished second ahead of Fossum’s Einar Melsom.

Standing after leg 1:

1 NOR Kristiansand OK (57) 1:05:20 Dag Blandkjenn 1:05:20
2 SWE Rehns BK (69) +1 Jerker Lysell 1:05:21
3 NOR Fossum IF (46) +7 Einar Melsom 1:05:27
4 SWE Stora Tuna OK (8) +8 Jesper Svensk 1:05:28
5 SWE IFK Göteborg (2) +9 Håvard Sandstad Eidsmo 1:05:29
6 FIN MS Parma (22) +10 Artem Popov 1:05:30
7 NOR Fredrikstad SK (15) +13 Mattias Karlsson 1:05:34
8 NOR Bäkkelagets SK (40) +15 Simen Hjalmar Wästlund 1:05:35
9 FIN Ikaalisten Nouseva-Voima (31) +16 Dmitry Tsvetkov 1:05:37
10 NOR NTNUI 2 (76) +18 Ulrik Astrup Arnesen 1:05:38
11 NOR Halden SK 2 (63) +19 Alexander Chepelin 1:05:39
12 FIN Lahden Suunnistajat -37 (50) +19 Philipp von Arx 1:05:39
13 FIN Paimion Rasti (3) +20 Samuel Heinonen 1:05:40
14 NOR Nydalens SK (7) +21 Alan Cherry 1:05:41
15 FIN Kalevan Rasti 2 (84) +21 Riccardo Rancan 1:05:42

Leg 2: Another Norwegian team first: Fredrikstad SK

Fredrikstad’s women won the Venla relay earlier on the day – but Fredrikstad can also do night orienteering, with Fredrikstad’s Hans Petter Mahisen coming first back after two legs. Tyrving is up there in second with Stora Tuna in third. Tampereen Pyrintö is down in 9th at +2:15 and IFK Göteborg is all the way down in 20th place at +3:40. Halden even further back, in 22nd with more than 5 minutes up to the leaders. Halden never came back up in the lead.

Standing after leg 2:

1 NOR Fredrikstad SK (15) 2:06:23 Hans Petter Mathisen 1:00:49
2 NOR IL Tyrving (11) +4 Björn Ekeberg 59:26
3 SWE Stora Tuna OK (8) +7 Henrik Johannesson 1:01:02
4 NOR Nydalens SK (7) +16 Anders Nordberg 1:00:58
5 FIN Turun Metsänkävijät (33) +19 Martins Sirmais 1:00:55
6 FIN MS Parma (22) +1:45 Arto Talvinen 1:02:39
7 FIN Kalevan Rasti (6) +2:12 Hannu Airila 1:02:19
8 FIN Paimion Rasti (3) +2:14 Vili Niemi 1:02:58
9 FIN Tampereen Pyrintö (14) +2:15 Severi Kymäläinen 1:02:53
10 FIN Lynx (23) +2:16 Antti Parjanne 1:02:39
11 FIN Ikaalisten Nouseva-Voima (31) +2:22 Lauri Oikarinen 1:03:09
12 NOR Bäkkelagets SK (40) +3:28 Carl Godager Kaas 1:04:16
13 SWE Tullinge SK (161) +3:30 Tomas Krivda 1:03:59
14 SWE Pan-Kristianstad (43) +3:32 Simon Wikström 1:03:57
15 FIN Hiidenkiertäjät (10) +3:33 Oskari Liukkonen 1:03:49

Leg 3: Tyrving on top, IFK Göteborg still in the fight

The real action starts on the long 3rd leg – this is where we get the answer to who makes it into the groups battling for top positions. Tyrving still runs impressive and comes back in the lead with Torgeir Nørbech. Stora Tuna is just behind, and as always IFK Göteborg comes out standing in third spot. Tampereen Pyrintö comes back in 6th place at +1:19.

Standing after leg 3:

1 NOR IL Tyrving (11) 3:24:39 Torgeir Nörbech 1:18:11
2 SWE Stora Tuna OK (8) +6 Olle Kalered 1:18:14
3 SWE IFK Göteborg (2) +10 Johan Högstrand 1:13:36
4 FIN Ikaalisten Nouseva-Voima (31) +11 Eetu Savolainen 1:16:05
5 NOR Nydalens SK (7) +25 Håvard Haga 1:18:25
6 FIN Tampereen Pyrintö (14) +1:19 Elias Kuukka 1:17:19
7 FIN Turun Metsänkävijät (33) +1:34 Jussi Suna 1:19:30
8 SWE OK Kåre (56) +1:50 Isac Von Krusenstierna 1:15:13
9 FIN Hiidenkiertäjät (10) +1:54 Leonid Novikov 1:16:36
10 FIN Kalevan Rasti (6) +2:09 Markus Räsänen 1:18:12
11 NOR Halden SK (4) +3:37 Jesse Laukkarinen 1:17:01
12 NOR Frol IL (17) +5:40 Stian Sundsvik 1:18:43
13 SWE Tullinge SK (161) +5:42 Simon Imark 1:20:28
14 SWE OK Linne (13) +5:59 Rassmus Andersson 1:19:26
15 FIN Paimion Rasti (3) +6:14 Toni Saari 1:22:15

Leg 4: Four teams left in the battle for victory

Only four legs left in the battle for victory after leg 4: Tampereen Pyrintö, Tyrving, Stora Tuna and IFK Göteborg – all four teams within 33 seconds. Down to TuMe in 5th the gap is nearly 4 minutes. Ikaalisten, TuMe, Nydalen, OK Kåre, Hiidenkiertäjät and Kalevan Rasti all lost the possibility to battle for the victory on this short, 7.2 km, fourth leg. As always, this is where you have to put your best men in order to be in the battle for victory!

Standing after leg 4:

1 FIN Tampereen Pyrintö (14) 4:10:05 Johan Runesson 44:06
2 NOR IL Tyrving (11) +5 Olle Boström 45:31
3 SWE Stora Tuna OK (8) +5 Joakim Svensk 45:25
4 SWE IFK Göteborg (2) +33 Vetle Ruud Bråten 45:49
5 FIN Turun Metsänkävijät (33) +3:43 Edgars Bertuks 47:35
6 FIN Kalevan Rasti (6) +7:09 Santeri Silvennoinen 50:27
7 FIN Paimion Rasti (3) +8:12 Pasi Ikonen 47:24
8 SWE OK Linne (13) +8:13 Oskar Sjöberg 47:40
9 FIN Koovee (1) +8:14 Timo Sild 45:43
10 FIN Hiidenkiertäjät (10) +8:18 Eemeli Suominen 51:50
11 NOR Nydalens SK (7) +8:20 Lukas Liland 53:21
12 FIN Ikaalisten Nouseva-Voima (31) +8:57 Tero Linnainmaa 54:11
13 NOR Frol IL (17) +14:11 Lars Sandstad Skjeset 53:57
14 NOR Fredrikstad SK (15) +17:56 Göran Winblad 53:31
15 SUI OLV Baselland (28) +17:56 Noah Zbinden 50:00

Leg 5: Three teams left in the battle for victory – IFK Göteborg loses contact

The 5th leg saw Tampereen Pyrintö running away from the other teams, opening up a 1:40 gap. But Stora Tuna and Tyrving managed to keep the gap down all the way until the finish, still finishing within 1:40 of the leading team. For IFK Göteborg it didn’t go that well, though – after the leg the gap up to leading Tampereen Pyrintö was more than 5 minutes. Now the battle for victory was between only three teams!

Standing after leg 5:

1 FIN Tampereen Pyrintö (14) 4:58:00 Mikko Eerola 47:54
2 SWE Stora Tuna OK (8) +1:13 Viktor Svensk 49:02
3 NOR IL Tyrving (11) +1:37 Håkon Jarvis Westergård 49:26
4 SWE IFK Göteborg (2) +5:01 Morten Jarvis Westergård 52:22
5 FIN Turun Metsänkävijät (33) +6:16 Eduardo Gil Marcos 50:26
6 SWE OK Linne (13) +6:18 Milos Nykodym 45:59
7 FIN Kalevan Rasti (6) +6:24 Graham Gristwood 47:09
8 FIN Paimion Rasti (3) +6:30 Bartosz Pawlak 46:11
9 NOR Nydalens SK (7) +8:10 Eirik Kamstrup Hovind 47:44
10 FIN Koovee (1) +10:32 Topi Anjala 50:12
11 FIN Hiidenkiertäjät (10) +12:55 Otto Loukkalahti 52:30
12 FIN Ikaalisten Nouseva-Voima (31) +15:28 Teemu Oksanen 54:26
13 NOR Frol IL (17) +16:45 Ulf Forseth Indgaard 50:28
14 NOR NTNUI (12) +17:59 Eirik Langedal Breivik 47:44
15 FIN Helsingin Suunnistajat (18) +20:30 Ollipekka Heikkilä 50:16

Leg 6: Three teams together

Some mistakes by all the three top teams on the 6th leg, but in the end they all finished the leg together, setting the scene for a thriller last leg. Behind the three top teams, Anders Ridefelt made a great race for OK Linné and closed the gap from 6:18 down to 3:01. A great race by Ridefelt, nearly taking OK Linné into the battle for victory. Further back in the field Olav Lundanes showed strength by running even 3(!) minutes faster than Ridefelt.

Standing after leg 6:

1 FIN Tampereen Pyrintö (14) 6:03:17 Aleksi Niemi 1:05:17
2 SWE Stora Tuna OK (8) +4 Anton Sjökvist 1:04:07
3 NOR IL Tyrving (11) +7 Andreas Kyburz 1:03:46
4 SWE OK Linne (13) +3:01 Albin Ridefelt 1:02:00
5 SWE IFK Göteborg (2) +6:00 Kasper Fosser 1:06:16
6 FIN Kalevan Rasti (6) +6:03 Pavel Kubat 1:04:56
7 FIN Koovee (1) +8:10 Olexander Kratov 1:02:55
8 FIN Paimion Rasti (3) +8:11 Nicolas Rio 1:06:58
9 FIN Turun Metsänkävijät (33) +8:59 Uldis Upitis 1:08:00
10 NOR Nydalens SK (7) +10:16 Elias Jonsson 1:07:22
11 NOR Halden SK (4) +17:55 Olav Lundanes 59:04
12 FIN Ikaalisten Nouseva-Voima (31) +18:14 Aleksi Karppinen 1:08:03
13 FIN Hiidenkiertäjät (10) +19:45 Olli-Pekka Koistinen 1:12:07
14 NOR NTNUI (12) +19:56 Vegard Jarvis Vestergård 1:07:13
15 SWE Södertälje Nykvarn Orienter (5) +20:39 Jonas Leandersson 1:04:11

Leg 7: Stora Tuna takes it!

The three top teams split up already at the forking at the 4th control, with Tampereen Pyrintö’s Florian Howald giving a gap of 40 seconds to Stora Tuna’s Emil Svensk and Tyrving’s Matthias Kyburz. On the next controls Kyburz did some smaller mistakes, and suddenly Svensk had a 2 minute lead to Kyburz. Svensk never gave away this lead – running an excellent race alone in front. And finally could celebrate with his team-mates!

Final standings:

1 8 Stora Tuna OK SWE 7:14:39
1 Jesper Svensk 1:05:28
2 Henrik Johannesson 1:01:02 2:06:31
3 Olle Kalered 1:18:14 3:24:45
4 Joakim Svensk 45:25 4:10:11
5 Viktor Svensk 49:02 4:59:13
6 Anton Sjökvist 1:04:07 6:03:21
7 Emil Svensk 1:11:18 7:14:39
2 11 IL Tyrving NOR 7:16:37
1 Wojciech Kowalski 1:07:01
2 Björn Ekeberg 59:26 2:06:28
3 Torgeir Nörbech 1:18:11 3:24:39
4 Olle Boström 45:31 4:10:11
5 Håkon Jarvis Westergård 49:26 4:59:37
6 Andreas Kyburz 1:03:46 6:03:24
7 Matthias Kyburz 1:13:13 7:16:37
3 14 Tampereen Pyrintö FIN 7:16:55
1 Otto Simosas 1:05:45
2 Severi Kymäläinen 1:02:53 2:08:39
3 Elias Kuukka 1:17:19 3:25:59
4 Johan Runesson 44:06 4:10:05
5 Mikko Eerola 47:54 4:58:00
6 Aleksi Niemi 1:05:17 6:03:17
7 Florian Howald 1:13:38 7:16:55
4 13 OK Linne SWE 7:17:20
1 Vincent Coupat 1:07:22
2 Jan Troeng 1:03:49 2:11:12
3 Rassmus Andersson 1:19:26 3:30:38
4 Oskar Sjöberg 47:40 4:18:19
5 Milos Nykodym 45:59 5:04:18
6 Albin Ridefelt 1:02:00 6:06:19
7 Lucas Basset 1:11:01 7:17:20
5 2 IFK Göteborg SWE 7:19:29
1 Håvard Sandstad Eidsmo 1:05:29
2 Andreas Sölberg 1:05:43 2:11:13
3 Johan Högstrand 1:13:36 3:24:49
4 Vetle Ruud Bråten 45:49 4:10:39
5 Morten Jarvis Westergård 52:22 5:03:01
6 Kasper Fosser 1:06:16 6:09:18
7 Max Peter Bejmer 1:10:11 7:19:29
6 6 Kalevan Rasti FIN 7:23:20
1 Jan Prochazka 1:06:16
2 Hannu Airila 1:02:19 2:08:35
3 Markus Räsänen 1:18:12 3:26:48
4 Santeri Silvennoinen 50:27 4:17:15
5 Graham Gristwood 47:09 5:04:24
6 Pavel Kubat 1:04:56 6:09:21
7 Miika Kirmula 1:13:59 7:23:20
7 1 Koovee FIN 7:23:37
1 Tim Robertson 1:05:45
2 Joni Hirvikallio 1:05:46 2:11:31
3 Lauri Sild 1:21:05 3:32:36
4 Timo Sild 45:43 4:18:20
5 Topi Anjala 50:12 5:08:32
6 Olexander Kratov 1:02:55 6:11:27
7 Daniel Hubmann 1:12:09 7:23:37
8 3 Paimion Rasti FIN 7:26:48
1 Samuel Heinonen 1:05:40
2 Vili Niemi 1:02:58 2:08:38
3 Toni Saari 1:22:15 3:30:54
4 Pasi Ikonen 47:24 4:18:18
5 Bartosz Pawlak 46:11 5:04:30
6 Nicolas Rio 1:06:58 6:11:29
7 Frédéric Tranchand 1:15:19 7:26:48
9 7 Nydalens SK NOR 7:28:43
1 Alan Cherry 1:05:41
2 Anders Nordberg 1:00:58 2:06:40
3 Håvard Haga 1:18:25 3:25:05
4 Lukas Liland 53:21 4:18:26
5 Eirik Kamstrup Hovind 47:44 5:06:10
6 Elias Jonsson 1:07:22 6:13:33
7 Jon Aukrust Osmoen 1:15:10 7:28:43
10 33 Turun Metsänkävijät FIN 7:30:51
1 Yannick Michiels 1:05:47
2 Martins Sirmais 1:00:55 2:06:43
3 Jussi Suna 1:19:30 3:26:14
4 Edgars Bertuks 47:35 4:13:49
5 Eduardo Gil Marcos 50:26 5:04:16
6 Uldis Upitis 1:08:00 6:12:17
7 Robert Merl 1:18:34 7:30:51
11 4 Halden SK NOR 7:33:36
1 Niels Christian Hellerud 1:06:01
2 Emil Wingstedt 1:05:14 2:11:15
3 Jesse Laukkarinen 1:17:01 3:28:17
4 Elias Bäcklund Ekvall 1:02:27 4:30:45
5 Riccardo Scalet 51:23 5:22:08
6 Olav Lundanes 59:04 6:21:12
7 Magne Dähli 1:12:23 7:33:36
12 5 Södertälje Nykvarn Orienter SWE 7:37:08
1 Michal Olejnik 1:07:01
2 Johan Ek Larsson 1:07:30 2:14:31
3 Kent Ohlsson 1:23:22 3:37:54
4 Jakob Enmark 51:28 4:29:22
5 Mathias Peter 50:22 5:19:45
6 Jonas Leandersson 1:04:11 6:23:57
7 Eric Börjeskog 1:13:11 7:37:08
13 12 NTNUI NOR 7:37:12
1 Olai Stensland Lillevold 1:06:02
2 Håkon Raadal Björlo 1:05:55 2:11:57
3 Rasmus Rörholt Theisen 1:28:54 3:40:52
4 Elias Thorsdal Mölnvik 47:22 4:28:14
5 Eirik Langedal Breivik 47:44 5:15:59
6 Vegard Jarvis Vestergård 1:07:13 6:23:13
7 Audun Heimdal 1:13:58 7:37:12
14 31 Ikaalisten Nouseva-Voima FIN 7:40:02
1 Dmitry Tsvetkov 1:05:37
2 Lauri Oikarinen 1:03:09 2:08:46
3 Eetu Savolainen 1:16:05 3:24:51
4 Tero Linnainmaa 54:11 4:19:02
5 Teemu Oksanen 54:26 5:13:29
6 Aleksi Karppinen 1:08:03 6:21:32
7 Mikko Knuuttila 1:18:29 7:40:02
15 10 Hiidenkiertäjät FIN 7:40:15
1 Mikko Patana 1:06:08
2 Oskari Liukkonen 1:03:49 2:09:57
3 Leonid Novikov 1:16:36 3:26:34
4 Eemeli Suominen 51:50 4:18:24
5 Otto Loukkalahti 52:30 5:10:55
6 Olli-Pekka Koistinen 1:12:07 6:23:03
7 Valentin Novikov 1:17:12 7:40:15

All results

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Jan Kocbach is the founder of WorldofO.com - taking care of everything from site development to writing articles, photography and analysis.

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6 comments

  1. After experiencing the Venla / Jukola event this weekend I have some thoughts about club identity and the rules around it. Ok, I get it – to be able to compete in the highly ranked 10-mila and Jukola relays you have to be in a club which can put a team into the competition. This leads to some of the mid european top runners join nordic clubs for this purpose.
    I know this is not compareable with international soccer, with all it’s big money involved and heavily guarded rules around transfer windows and contracts, but what are the actual rules?
    I guess both Matthias Kyburz and Daniel Hubmann also have their own swiss clubs when competing there. Johan Runesson has this season represented both IFK Lidingö SOK and Tamperen Pyrintö in different swedish competitions. So, what are the rules?
    How many clubs can you compete for, and how many changes of club identity can you do under one season?

  2. Jukola Relay follows The Finnish Orienteering Federation’s rules: https://www.suunnistusliitto.fi/system/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Lajisaannot_20190417.pdf (in Finnish)

    Relevant part of eligibility rules are following:

    “2.2 Edustusoikeus
    2.21 Edustusoikeudella tarkoitetaan seuraedustusta kilpailussa ja se on sidoksissa kilpailukauteen (katso 1.231). Edustusoikeutta voidaan soveltaa
    myös muuhun suunnistustoimintaan.
    2.22 Urheilija voi samalla kilpailukaudella edustaa Suomessa lajeittain (katso
    8.1) vain yhtä seuraa yleisessä kilpailussa (katso 8.22).
    2.221 Edustusoikeutta vailla oleva urheilija ei voi osallistua yleiseen kilpailuun tai mestaruuskilpailuun.
    2.222 Urheilija voi edustusoikeudestaan riippumatta edustaa kotimaataan kansainvälisissä arvokilpailuissa. Urheilija ja tukihenkilö
    ovat edustustehtävän aikana kansallisen liittonsa sääntöjen alaisia.
    12
    2.223 Yleisessä kilpailussa edustusoikeudeltaan eri seurojen urheilijoista koostuvaa yhdistelmäjoukkuetta ei sallita Suomessa.
    2.224 Jukolan ja Venlojen viestin sekä Nuorten Jukolan osalta voidaan
    liiton luvalla poiketa kohdan 2.223 säännöksestä (katso 2.13,
    2.22 ja 2.221).
    2.225 Farmisopimuksella (katso 1.249) voidaan poiketa kohdan 2.223
    säännöksestä (katso 2.13, 2.22 ja 2.221).”

    Very complex rules that state an individual orienteer can represent only one club during season, thought change of club is allowed and possible between seasons. However, there are moment 2.224 that allow exceptions in Jukola, Venla, and Youth Jukola Relays if permission is requested to and granted for that.

    Seemingly orienteer’s nationality is irrelevant to nationality of his/hers club of participation (Swedes can join Finnish teams etc.)

    While not entirely sure about it, there may be such kind permissions for exceptions to participate granted to individual orienteer that have done their written, formal application for it.

    The Finnish Federation should really make rules more clear concerning these eligibility things, and provide some kind easier version to read for international readers in English about those rules. (I couldn’t find such)

  3. Armas, what I can understand from your writing in english it seems to me that there has to be quite many exceptions from the main rule for competing in the Jukola relay. Maybe to an extent that it has transformed into a new main rule?

  4. Perhaps it is interpreted as running for one club in all Finnish season competitions unless the exception? I remember a few years ago Fabian Hertner running for his Swiss club in Jukola, with the article saying this was with Kalevan Rasti’s permission.

  5. Well, all in all it’s a very fluid situation with club identity these days, whatever rules applied, or made exceptions from, in different countries and competitions. And even though having no big moral issues with that, I still think it’s all nice to see that the very home grown and locally produced team of Stora Tuna makes it all the way to the top of the podium in Jukola.

  6. Bernt O. Myrvold

    IOF have no rules for changing clubs. Some ten-fifteen years ago some of us was working quite hard to try to harmonize the rules for the Nordic countries. It proved quite impossible. The different countries has their own rules and their own general assemblies that decides the national rules.
    More or less ther only thing all countries could agree on was that their jurisdiction ends at a border. What a Norwegian runner does in Norway is governed by the Norwegian rules, what he does in Finland is governed by the Finnish rules. This obviosuly left a large grey zone. The Norwegian rules stated that you could join a new club at any time. The Finnish rules had limits on when you could change clubs. So going from Finland to Norway you would breach the Finnish rules, but not the Norwegian. There were no way the Finnish rules could be used to punish you in Norway. The pragmatic approach was that the elite clubs (mostly) have contracts with their best runners the regulates what obligation they have towards the club.

    Another thing that was agreed upon back then was that you could only participate in one natinal championship over a given distance in one year. I think a few runners was disqualified for breaching this rule, but it proved unenforceable in the long run.
    One, nameless, Finnish runner took part in the Norwegian Middle distance championship with great success. Three weeks later in the Finnish Championship. Removing him from the Norwegian result list would clearly break the Norwergian Sports Federation Rules, that you cannot disqualify a runner if he/she has has breached a rule that has no influence on the sporting performabnce and result. And it is hard to argue that running a new competition three weeks later will give you any advantage.

    BOM