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WOC 2018 Sprint: Maps and Results

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[Updated with some analysis and splits graphs] Maja Alm (DEN) and Daniel Hubmann (SUI) took the victories in the WOC 2018 Sprint (#WOC2018) after very tight races where we saw some decisive routechoices in the narrow streets of Riga, with lots of added artificial fences.

The silver and bronze medals went to Tove Alexandersson (SWE) and Judith Wyder (SUI) in the women’s class. Tim Robertson (NZL) and Andreas Kyburz (SUI) took the remaining medals in the men’s class.

Robertson in the lead at the second last control

Especially the men’s race was tight with Hubmann deciding on the last meters, pushing Tim Robertson  into second with Andreas Kyburz in third. Hubmann and Robertson were very close throughout the race, with Robertson with a 0.6 second lead at the second last control.

Hubmann and Robertson were very close throughout the race, with Robertson with a 0.6 second lead at the second last control.

Hubmann was faster to the last control, gaining a lead of 0.3 second – and increasing to 1.1 second in the finish. The battle for bronze medal was equally exciting – with Andreas Kyburz (Matthias Kyburz’ older brother) – taking bronze 0.6 seconds ahead of Yannick Michiels (BEL). Michiels was actually 0.3 seconds ahead at the very last control, but lost 0.9 seconds and the bronze medal in the run-in.

Michiels was actually 0.3 seconds ahead at the very last control, but lost 0.9 seconds and the bronze medal in the run-in.

Several other runners were also in the battle for bronze – with Matthias Kyburz being equal with Michiels and ahead of his brother Andreas at control 17. Emil Svensk, Andreu Blanes and Martin Regborn were also in the bronze battle towards the very end.

 

Alm with fast finish

In the women’s class Tove Alexandersson was in the lead after 15 of 17 controls – but lost 13 seconds and the victory chances to the 16th control. Alexandersson’s time loss on the 16th control was a combination of  longer routechoice (A for Alm, B for Alexandersson below), higher speed for Alm (Alm wins the leg with 9 second, the usual Alm-Turbo at the end of a race) and a small uncertainty for Alexandersson. Impressive final part of the race for Alm!

Alm was also 5 seconds faster than Alexandersson to the 17th control. In the end the gap from Alm to Alexandersson in second was 16 seconds, with another 10 seconds down to Wyder in bronze position. No other women were really in the battle for the medals.

Maps and GPS-tracking

 

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See maps above and GPS-tracking below. Maps from the qualification are included at the bottom of the article along with qualification results.

Results

Men

1 Daniel Hubmann Switzerland 14:05 3:16 A
2 Tim Robertson New Zealand 14:07 +0:01 3:16 A
3 Andreas Kyburz Switzerland 14:26 +0:20 3:21 A
4 Yannick Michiels Belgium 14:26 +0:20 3:21 A
5 Matthias Kyburz Switzerland 14:28 +0:22 3:21 A
6 Emil Svensk Sweden 14:28 +0:22 3:21 A
7 Andreu Blanes Spain 14:29 +0:23 3:22 A
8 Martin Regborn Sweden 14:34 +0:28 3:23 A
9 Artem Popov Russian Federation 14:43 +0:37 3:25 A
10 Kristian Jones Great Britain 14:44 +0:38 3:25 A
11 Vojtech Kral Czech Republic 14:46 +0:40 3:26 A
12 Milos Nykodym Czech Republic 14:46 +0:40 3:26 A
13 Hakon Jarvis Westergard Norway 14:47 +0:41 3:26 A
14 Aleksi Niemi Finland 14:48 +0:42 3:26 A
15 Jakob Edsen Denmark 14:48 +0:43 3:26 A
16 Martin Hubmann Switzerland 14:51 +0:45 3:27 A
17 Lucas Basset France 14:55 +0:49 3:28 A
18 Piotr Parfianowicz Poland 14:56 +0:50 3:28 A
19 Jonas Leandersson Sweden 14:56 +0:51 3:28 A
20 Antonio Martinez Perez Spain 14:57 +0:51 3:28 A

Women

1 Maja Alm Denmark 13:43 3:36 A
2 Tove Alexandersson Sweden 14:00 +0:16 3:41 A
3 Judith Wyder Switzerland 14:10 +0:27 3:43 A
4 Elena Roos Switzerland 14:16 +0:33 3:45 A
5 Lina Strand Sweden 14:28 +0:45 3:48 A
6 Karolin Ohlsson Sweden 14:32 +0:49 3:49 A
7 Anastasia Denisova Belarus 14:39 +0:56 3:51 A
8 Alice Leake Great Britain 14:46 +1:03 3:53 A
9 Natalia Gemperle Russian Federation 14:49 +1:06 3:53 A
10 Galina Vinogradova Russian Federation 14:50 +1:07 3:54 A
11 Marika Teini Finland 14:53 +1:10 3:55 A
12 Ursula Kadan Austria 14:55 +1:12 3:55 A
13 Anna Narhi Finland 14:58 +1:15 3:56 A
14 Maija Sianoja Finland 15:03 +1:20 3:57 A
15 Anastasia Rudnaya Russian Federation 15:07 +1:24 3:58 A
16 Aleksandra Hornik Poland 15:16 +1:33 4:01 A
17 Sandra Grosberga Latvia 15:17 +1:33 4:01 A
18 Sigrid Alexandersen Norway 15:19 +1:36 4:01 A
19 Tereza Janosikova Czech Republic 15:22 +1:39 4:02 A
20 Isia Basset France 15:28 +1:45 4:04 A

Qualification maps

SPRINT_Q_MEN-C SPRINT_Q_MEN-B SPRINT_Q_MEN-A SPRINT_Q_WOMEN-C SPRINT_Q_WOMEN-B SPRINT_Q_WOMEN-A

Qualifications results

Men A

1 Tim Robertson New Zealand 11:44 3:21 A
2 Ahmet Kacmaz Turkey 11:51 +0:07 3:23 A
3 Andrey Khramov Russian Federation 11:54 +0:10 3:24 A
4 Kristian Jones Great Britain 11:55 +0:11 3:24 A
5 Vojtech Kral Czech Republic 12:02 +0:18 3:26 A
6 Andreas Kyburz Switzerland 12:03 +0:19 3:26 A
7 Magnus Dewett Denmark 12:04 +0:20 3:26 A
8 Andrea Seppi Italy 12:06 +0:22 3:27 A
8 Aleksi Niemi Finland 12:06 +0:22 3:27 A
8 Arturs Paulins Latvia 12:06 +0:22 3:27 A
11 Trond Einar Moen Pedersli Norway 12:07 +0:23 3:27 A
11 Emil Svensk Sweden 12:07 +0:23 3:27 A
13 Algirdas Bartkevicius Lithuania 12:08 +0:24 3:28 A
14 Eduardo Gil Marcos Spain 12:10 +0:26 3:28 A
15 Martin Hubmann Switzerland 12:11 +0:27 3:28 A

Men B

1 Yannick Michiels Belgium 11:00 3:08 A
2 Artem Popov Russian Federation 11:12 +0:12 3:12 A
3 Piotr Parfianowicz Poland 11:15 +0:15 3:12 A
4 Andreu Blanes Spain 11:17 +0:17 3:13 A
5 Daniel Hubmann Switzerland 11:23 +0:23 3:15 A
5 Miika Kirmula Finland 11:23 +0:23 3:15 A
7 Marek Minar Czech Republic 11:24 +0:24 3:15 A
8 Andris Jubelis Latvia 11:25 +0:25 3:15 A
9 Martin Regborn Sweden 11:27 +0:27 3:16 A
10 Jon Aukrust Osmoen Norway 11:33 +0:33 3:18 A
11 Riccardo Scalet Italy 11:35 +0:35 3:18 A
12 Damian Konotopetz Canada 11:37 +0:37 3:19 A
13 Peter Hodkinson Great Britain 11:40 +0:40 3:20 A
14 Matthias Groell Austria 11:45 +0:45 3:21 A
15 Vilius Aleliunas Lithuania 11:49 +0:49 3:22 A

Men C

1 Jonas Leandersson Sweden 11:36 3:13 A
2 Milos Nykodym Czech Republic 11:46 +0:10 3:16 A
3 Lucas Basset France 11:50 +0:14 3:17 A
4 Hakon Jarvis Westergard Norway 11:52 +0:16 3:17 A
5 Matthias Kyburz Switzerland 11:58 +0:22 3:19 A
6 Rudolfs Zernis Latvia 11:59 +0:23 3:19 A
7 Ruslan Glibov Ukraine 12:07 +0:31 3:21 A
8 Chris Smithard Great Britain 12:08 +0:32 3:22 A
9 Jonas Vytautas Gvildys Lithuania 12:09 +0:33 3:22 A
10 Antonio Martinez Perez Spain 12:12 +0:36 3:23 A
11 Jakob Edsen Denmark 12:14 +0:38 3:23 A
12 Michal Olejnik Poland 12:18 +0:42 3:25 A
13 Ricardo Esteves Ferreira Portugal 12:20 +0:44 3:25 A
14 Roman Ciobanu Romania 12:44 +1:08 3:32 A
15 Tomas Hendrickx Belgium 12:47 +1:11 3:33 A
15 Mattia Debertolis Italy 12:47 +1:11 3:33 A

Women A

1 Karolin Ohlsson Sweden 12:00 3:52 A
2 Virag Weiler Hungary 12:11 +0:11 3:55 A
3 Megan Carter Davies Great Britain 12:14 +0:14 3:56 A
4 Sigrid Alexandersen Norway 12:21 +0:21 3:59 A
5 Kateryna Dzema Ukraine 12:22 +0:22 3:59 A
6 Ursula Kadan Austria 12:33 +0:33 4:02 A
7 Maija Sianoja Finland 12:34 +0:34 4:03 A
8 Laura Robertson New Zealand 12:35 +0:35 4:03 A
9 Galina Vinogradova Russian Federation 12:52 +0:52 4:09 A
9 Alison Crocker United States 12:52 +0:52 4:09 A
11 Caroline Gjotterup Denmark 12:56 +0:56 4:10 A
12 Adela Indrakova Czech Republic 13:01 +1:01 4:11 A
13 Lea Vercellotti France 13:12 +1:12 4:15 A
14 Natasha Key Australia 13:15 +1:15 4:16 A
15 Zuzanna Kubicka Poland 13:18 +1:18 4:17 A

Women B

1 Judith Wyder Switzerland 11:43 3:33 A
2 Lina Strand Sweden 12:19 +0:36 3:43 A
3 Natalia Gemperle Russian Federation 12:27 +0:44 3:46 A
4 Sandra Grosberga Latvia 12:28 +0:45 3:46 A
5 Alice Leake Great Britain 12:35 +0:52 3:48 A
6 Agata Stankiewicz Poland 12:37 +0:54 3:49 A
7 Tereza Janosikova Czech Republic 12:41 +0:58 3:50 A
8 Marika Teini Finland 12:46 +1:03 3:52 A
9 Ingjerd Myhre Norway 12:47 +1:04 3:52 A
10 Kristina Yakubkina Belarus 12:59 +1:16 3:56 A
11 Iliana Ilieva Bulgaria 13:02 +1:19 3:56 A
12 Maelle Beauvir France 13:15 +1:32 4:00 A
13 Ausrine Kutkaite Lithuania 13:16 +1:33 4:01 A
14 Francesca Taufer Italy 13:19 +1:36 4:02 A
15 Imogene Scott New Zealand 13:34 +1:51 4:06 A

Women C

1 Maja Alm Denmark 12:20 3:37 A
2 Anastasia Denisova Belarus 12:30 +0:10 3:40 A
3 Anastasia Rudnaya Russian Federation 12:47 +0:27 3:45 A
4 Elena Roos Switzerland 12:50 +0:30 3:46 A
5 Tove Alexandersson Sweden 13:03 +0:43 3:50 A
6 Aleksandra Hornik Poland 13:11 +0:51 3:52 A
7 Isia Basset France 13:16 +0:56 3:54 A
8 Silje Ekroll Jahren Norway 13:17 +0:57 3:54 A
9 Anna Narhi Finland 13:18 +0:58 3:54 A
9 Laura Ramstein Austria 13:18 +0:58 3:54 A
11 Charlotte Ward Great Britain 13:33 +1:13 3:59 A
12 Susen Loesch Germany 13:35 +1:15 3:59 A
13 Olena Fedorova Ukraine 13:38 +1:18 4:00 A
14 Maria Prieto Spain 13:40 +1:20 4:01 A
15 Carlotta Scalet Italy 13:53 +1:33 4:05 A

About Jan Kocbach

Jan Kocbach is the founder of WorldofO.com - taking care of everything from site development to writing articles, photography and analysis.

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4 comments

  1. It’s a shame that the poor placement of the start kite played such a decisive role – I reckon confusion over which kite was the last control easily cost Tim Robertson more than 1.2 seconds.

    • For men I do not think that it was decisive or unfair in any way. Men were running directly towards the last control with good visibility of it from long distance and they should have read the legend.

      But I can see how this could have been a problem for women, who had the start point right in their line of visibility, when approaching the last control, which was not directly visible. Luckily it did not affect the medals, even though some runners lost a few seconds there and some were given hints by spectators.

      I do not know the rules of control placement and perhaps technically the start point doesn’t count as a control point. However, I agree that the placement of these two points were bad and short-sighted. Even if the misleading start point was addressed, there would still be an issue with opposite flows of runners, who could have collided.

  2. The FairPlay is far to seek in this one , unfortunately. The results are approximately right though, but Hubmann could be the second, Yannick could be the third in the FairPlay condition. Because of such bad organisation we would never know who was really the best! If you don’t know what I am talking about, look back the video coverage how some danish jerk pointed Maja towards direction of the last control. And! There is more! Damn shame, people where training the whole year for this peace of junk competition. Shame on IOF and shame on organisers. So disappointing…..

    • While you are right, I think Alm had such a lead that she would still finish 1st. Maybe not by 15 seconds but by 10 or 5..
      Im wondering, if it would be possible to change the color of the start from white/orange to something else like white/blue to reduce the confusion