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WC Liberec Chasing start: Map and Results


Marc Lauenstein took a surprise victory for Switzerland and Minna Kauppi is finally back on the top with another World Cup victory. The long distance chasing start in Liberec was a tough one – with more than 1:40 running time in the mens class and 80 minutes in the women’s class.

Marc Lauenstein had start number 14 – and headed into the forest 2:10 behind Thierry Gueorgiou. Gueorgiou started first as yesterday’s winner Pasi Ikonen could not start due to stomach sickness.

Maps

The course was varied with several butterflies and some very long legs. Both the men and the women had the same very long leg to the first control – below you see one illustration for the mens long leg and including routes and a corresponding illustration for the women. Interestingly, the women are fastest when going far left, whereas the men are fastest when going direct. Gueorgiou lost more than a minute already to the first control by taking a left choice – whereas the fastest 4-5 women go left. And none of the women choose the direct variant which is fastest for the men.

Complete map/GPS-tracking:

longleg1_colorroute_l_s
longwomen_colorroute_l_s

Links and stories
Results

Men

1. Marc Lauenstein            SUI  41.35 (14)  101.40 ( 1)  143.15
2. Thierry Gueorgiou          FRA  39.25 ( 2)  104.13 ( 3)  143.38   0.23
3. Topi Anjala                FIN  41.51 (18)  102.28 ( 2)  144.19   1.04
4. Daniel Hubmann             SUI  40.06 ( 4)  105.02 ( 4)  145.08   1.53
5. William Lind               SWE  40.38 ( 7)  105.18 ( 6)  145.56   2.41
6. Mats Haldin                FIN  41.47 (16)  105.29 ( 7)  147.16   4.01
7. Jerker Lysell              SWE  42.56 (29)  105.12 ( 5)  148.08   4.53
8. Matthias Merz              SUI  41.33 (13)  106.44 (11)  148.17   5.02
9. Gernot Kerschbaumer        AUT  40.00 ( 3)  108.31 (20)  148.31   5.16
10. Erik Rost                  SWE  43.02 (30)  105.33 ( 8)  148.35   5.20

1. Marc Lauenstein            SUI  41.35 (14)  101.40 ( 1)  143.15

2. Thierry Gueorgiou          FRA  39.25 ( 2)  104.13 ( 3)  143.38   0.23

3. Topi Anjala                FIN  41.51 (18)  102.28 ( 2)  144.19   1.04

4. Daniel Hubmann             SUI  40.06 ( 4)  105.02 ( 4)  145.08   1.53

5. William Lind               SWE  40.38 ( 7)  105.18 ( 6)  145.56   2.41

6. Mats Haldin                FIN  41.47 (16)  105.29 ( 7)  147.16   4.01

7. Jerker Lysell              SWE  42.56 (29)  105.12 ( 5)  148.08   4.53

8. Matthias Merz              SUI  41.33 (13)  106.44 (11)  148.17   5.02

9. Gernot Kerschbaumer        AUT  40.00 ( 3)  108.31 (20)  148.31   5.16

10. Erik Rost                  SWE  43.02 (30)  105.33 ( 8)  148.35   5.20

Women

1. Minna Kauppi               FIN  39.56 ( 2)   78.43 ( 3)  118.39

2. Dana Šafka Brožková        CZE  39.38 ( 1)   79.26 ( 8)  119.04   0.25

3. Tove Alexandersson         SWE  40.31 ( 4)   78.48 ( 4)  119.19   0.40

4. Signe Søes                 DEN  42.48 ( 8)   76.55 ( 1)  119.43   1.04

5. Eva Juřeníková             CZE  42.02 ( 6)   77.54 ( 2)  119.56   1.17

6. Ines Brodmann              SUI  41.56 ( 5)   79.02 ( 5)  120.58   2.19

7. Maja Møller Alm            DEN  42.41 ( 7)   79.02 ( 5)  121.43   3.04

8. Lena Eliasson              SWE  43.25 ( 9)   81.04 (12)  124.29   5.50

9. Mari Fasting               NOR  45.25 (19)   81.05 (13)  126.30   7.51

10. Rahel Friederich           SUI  44.24 (12)   82.08 (16)  126.32   7.53

About Jan Kocbach

Jan Kocbach is the founder of WorldofO.com - taking care of everything from site development to writing articles, photography and analysis.

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9 comments

  1. Whats happened with Helena? Why is DNS?

  2. The first runners lost of time on the way to first control because of high grass in the field. Lot of tracks for late runners and womens.

  3. It could be intresting to have a closer look at the loops effect and fairness.

    • It would indeed. You are usually up to it? :)
      As I understood, they gave runners loops based on every second runner arriving getting the same loop, not based on startnumber? That is one step in the direction of dead running if that is so?

      • Really? I am not sure if that would be better or worse than a rigid switch under the yesterdays circumstances.

        The longer I think about the more critical I am about the yesterday course setting… :-P

        Another aspect is, that yesterdays race first part was a rather realistic simulation of what they plan the futures WOC Middle Distance to be. 44 runners in five minutes on a Middle. Gosh! :-)

      • possible to do some tactics?
        If you are in group with Guergiou and some hanging guy you should try to be third in order to get same forking than Thierry?

        Or Thierry should try to be 2nd to get different forking than other two?

        Btw. how they controlled that runners took loops in right order? Did they keep track when giving out maps (difficult with large groups?) or just checked at the finish which map each runner had?

      • the map exchange was not based on the st.# but by the order the runners arrived to the map exchange. The maps were given in this order A, B, C, D, A, B, C, D, A, B, C, D, etc. as they were 4 loops in the butterfly.

  4. It’s long known fact butterflies does not work well for mass start/chase and are not fair either. It worked here a usual, some got free ride in nice group, some had to run on their own or with slower group – up to luck.

    On the other hand, interval start middle was far more interesting and exiting to spectate on TV and on site too I guess. If spectators find interval start more interesting and it does better TV show and is less expensive to make, then who actually want this chase format. Athletes??