Home / Orienteering News / WOC Long 2014: Maps and Results

WOC Long 2014: Maps and Results

menstart
Thierry Gueorgiou (France) and Svetlana Mironova (Russia) won the WOC long distance in Lavarone, Italy today. Mironova was an outsider after her medal at the European Championships long distance, and did a technically close to perfect race on a day where the main favourites Tove Alexandersson (Sweden) and Judith Wyder (Switzerland) did not manage to get all the way to the top – but still took silver and bronze, respectively.

In the men’s class Gueorgiou was the main favourite – with Daniel Hubmann (Switzerland) and Olav Lundanes (Norway) very close: The three big long distance orienteers of the last 7 years – sharing the six gold medals from 2008 to 2013 equally among them. This year Gueorgiou took the long distane throne alone after beating Hubmann with around 90 seconds and Lundanes with around 2:30. Read the full story about the men’s race here.

Maps and courses

Maps and courses are available here:

The full analysis of the race will be published tomorrow morning – it will be an interesting evening analyzing the course!

Results women

1 Svetlana Mironova Russia 1:19:44

2 Tove Alexandersson Sweden 1:20:15 +0:31

3 Judith Wyder Switzerland 1:20:34 +0:50

4 Mari Fasting Norway 1:22:06 +2:22

5 Goril Ronning Sund Norway 1:22:38 +2:54

6 Annika Billstam Sweden 1:22:40 +2:56

7 Tone Wigemyr Norway 1:22:41 +2:57

8 Sarina Jenzer Switzerland 1:22:43 +2:59

9 Sofia Haajanen Finland 1:24:29 +4:45

10 Ida Bobach Denmark 1:25:05 +5:21

11 Saila Kinni Finland 1:25:19 +5:35

12 Ines Brodmann Switzerland 1:25:55 +6:11

13 Hanny Allston Australia 1:25:56 +6:12

14 Amelie Chataing France 1:26:06 +6:22

15 Ursula Kadan Austria 1:26:32 +6:48

Results men

1 Thierry Gueorgiou France 1:34:45

2 Daniel Hubmann Switzerland 1:36:12 +1:27

3 Olav Lundanes Norway 1:37:09 +2:24

4 Fabian Hertner Switzerland 1:38:39 +3:54

5 Matthias Kyburz Switzerland 1:40:12 +5:27

6 Fredrik Johansson Sweden 1:40:16 +5:31

7 Baptiste Rollier Switzerland 1:41:19 +6:34

8 Gernot Kerschbaumer Austria 1:41:40 +6:55

9 Kiril Nikolov Bulgaria 1:41:59 +7:14

10 Filip Dahlgren Sweden 1:42:15 +7:30

11 Magne Daehli Norway 1:42:27 +7:42

12 Ionut Alin Zinca Romania 1:42:55 +8:10

13 Francois Gonon France 1:43:47 +9:02

14 Frederic Tranchand France 1:44:20 +9:35

15 Dmitriy Tsvetkov Russia 1:44:51 +10:06

1 Thierry Gueorgiou France 1:34:45
2 Daniel Hubmann Switzerland 1:36:12 +1:27
3 Olav Lundanes Norway 1:37:09 +2:24
4 Fabian Hertner Switzerland 1:38:39 +3:54
5 Matthias Kyburz Switzerland 1:40:12 +5:27
6 Fredrik Johansson Sweden 1:40:16 +5:31
7 Baptiste Rollier Switzerland 1:41:19 +6:34
8 Gernot Kerschbaumer Austria 1:41:40 +6:55
9 Kiril Nikolov Bulgaria 1:41:59 +7:14
10 Filip Dahlgren Sweden 1:42:15 +7:30
11 Magne Daehli Norway 1:42:27 +7:42
12 Ionut Alin Zinca Romania 1:42:55 +8:10
13 Francois Gonon France 1:43:47 +9:02
14 Frederic Tranchand France 1:44:20 +9:35
15 Dmitriy Tsvetkov Russia 1:44:51 +10:06

About Jan Kocbach

Jan Kocbach is the founder of WorldofO.com - taking care of everything from site development to writing articles, photography and analysis.

Check Also

oringenday5_w21e_11_blank_s

Route to Christmas: Day 21 2019

Today’s leg in Route to Christmas is a long leg from the largest individual orienteering ...

One comment

  1. Øystein Grøvlen

    I am surprised that Kiril Nikolov was not disqualified. It is evident from GPS tracking that he has no idea of where he is when he arrives at Georgiou’s control #19. It is clear that this is in violation of competition rule 1.2 which says that one should “navigate and run through the terrain
    independently”

    I also think that to reduce the problem of following, starting order should be the reverse of the current WRE ranking. This has several advantages:

    1. Runners starting after each other will be at about the same
    level. Hence, change of catching up with the runners
    ahead will be smaller.

    2. Runners being caught will be less satisfied with just
    following. E.g, if Lundanes was caught by Georgiou, he
    would probably try to get away in order to have a chance
    to beat him.

    3. If someone still get a good result by following, they
    would have “earned it” through good results in previous
    races.