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Junior European Cup: Maps and Results

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Some very interesting long legs met the young runners at the Junior European Cup in Germany this weekend. Especially the long distance was interesting – above you see the longest leg in the men’s oldest junior class (M20) from the men’s long distance.

This leg – and similar long legs in the other classes – was definitely a challenge for the runners – many losing significant time on the longest leg in the course. It is definitely not easy to find a very good solution here – especially if you are used to very different terrain types. Below some alternatives are drawn for this leg. Would you choose any of these alternatives – or maybe another one? Unfortunately there was no GPS-tracking at the race, but a RouteGadget is set up and hopefully many of the runners use the opportunity to enter their routes there.

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JEC: Three races – Sprint, Long and Relay

Formerly the Six Nations competition, the  Junior European Cup (JEC) is essentially a team competition consisting of  sprint, long and relay, with each nation’s top runners scoring points towards the Nations Cup. The original six nations (Great Britain, Switzerland, France, Belgium, Austria and Germany) always attend, and the organizers can invite any other European nations.  JEC classes are M/D 18 and M/D 20. JEC  is often a starting point for many international careers along with EYOC, and one typically sees many of the best performers in JWOC starting and doing well also at JEC.

Maps and RouteGadget

Maps and RouteGadget:

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An extra look at the long distance for M20/W20

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W20: Sara Hagström won 1:26 minutes ahead of Andrea Svensson with Andrine Benjaminsen in 3rd at 2:29. Sara Hagström won 7 of 18 legs while doing several minutes of time losses. Sara Hagström took the lead at the first control and stayed in front until control 2. The race lead then changed between Mariia Zasimovskaia (leading at the 3rd control, losing 4:16 at the 4th control and falling down to 18th place), Andrea Svensson (leading from the 4th to 5th control, losing 27 seconds and the lead at the 6th), Sara Hagström (leading from the 6th to 7th control, losing 46 seconds and the lead at the 8th) and Andrea Svensson (leading at the 8th control, losing 32 seconds and the lead at the 9th) until Sara Hagström took over the lead at control 9 of 18 controls and kept it until the finish.

Note how Hagström won the long leg to the 4th control – this was a central reason for her victory.  Many runners lost time to control 4 – below timeloss for Top 10 is shown sorted by control number.

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M20

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M20: Thomas Curiger won 1:24 minutes ahead of Tobia Pezzati with Arnaud Perrin in 3rd at 1:40. Thomas Curiger won 3 of 21. Thomas Curiger lost 43 seconds or less to the leg winner on all legs – that was least of all runners in this race. The fight for victory was close; Tobia Pezzati (lost 1:37 at leg 4, finished 1:24 behind in 2nd) was only one control away from beating Thomas Curiger. Andreas Sølberg took the lead at the first control. The race lead then changed between Tobia Pezzati (leading at the 2nd control, losing 16 seconds and the lead at the 3rd), Erik Andersson (leading at the 3rd control, losing 2:26 at the 4th control and falling down to 15th place) and Markus Holter (leading from the 4th to 6th control, losing 44 seconds and the lead at the 7th) until Thomas Curiger took over the lead at control 7 of 21 controls and kept it until the finish.

Curiger had one of the best split times on the long leg to control 4 – only 6 seconds behind the best split time. Again important for the overall victory were Tobia Pezzati in second lost more than one and a half minute to Curiger. Many runners lost time to control 4 – below timeloss for Top 10 is shown sorted by control number.

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Results Long

Note that all results below are taken from live results as these have the added benefit of giving intermediate times. Please add a note below if there are changes in the official results; in that case the results will be replaces with official results. Official results are available here.

long4 long3 long2 long1

Results Sprint

W20 W18 M20 M18

Results Relay

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About Jan Kocbach

Jan Kocbach is the founder of WorldofO.com - taking care of everything from site development to writing articles, photography and analysis.

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4 comments

  1. Added my routes on routegadget. In my opinion, a route to the right is definitely the best at control number 4, though keeping focus all the way was a real challenge. If i could run the leg a second time, i would choose your variant D, but already run to the right on the very first part of the route.

  2. I have slao added my route, I run left and then in the middle on the Street, I probalby lost 10-15 sec near the control, but the route choiche was surely longer and slower.
    Tanhk you for your Always great analysis and how do we see the intermediate times on liveresultat?

  3. @Thomas/@Tobia: Thanks for info about your routes – this is according to my thoughts. I think maybe B, but then going down the valley instead would be a good alternative.

    > how do we see the intermediate times on liveresultat?
    This is in the standard view at liveresultat.orientering.se. Maybe my comment there was not clear enough.

  4. For your information: Complete and official split times (including WinSplits analysis) are available now on our website:
    http://www.jec2015.de/en/results